Dynamic duo bonds with football

Two football players reminisce on their last season together

Junior+Tre+Jordan+and+senior+Anthony+Jones+go+in+for+a+chest+bump+after+Jones+intercepts+the+ball.+The+Wildcats+won+against+Langham+Creek+Lobos+on+October+5.

Sanna Apolskis

Junior Tre Jordan and senior Anthony Jones go in for a chest bump after Jones intercepts the ball. The Wildcats won against Langham Creek Lobos on October 5.

Emma McFarland, Contributing Writer

With thousands behind them, they jump and then bump – senior defensive back Anthony Jones and junior cornerback Treton Jordan celebrate a Wildcat interception.
To hype each other up on the field, the two boys often do their classic chest bump after a good play. To them, it’s like a high five but only with your chest, and has a better meaning to it.
“The meaning of a chest bump is when something was done good,” Jordan said. “It’s really just better than a pat on the back.”
Their two-year friendship didn’t start with a bond. Jordan came from his hometown, Orange, Texas, to Tomball, and the first time Jones and Jordan met, they felt like bulls ready to butt heads.
“We didn’t think we’d be friends like we are now,” Jordan said, shaking his head.
Once the two started to play defense on the varsity team, a friendship was built. Seeing each other everyday on the field led to hanging out outside the turf.
“He is my son,” Jones said about Jordan.
The thing they do all the time is to go out to eat – the two boys eat a lot.
“Everytime we are off that field me and Anthony are eating,” Jordan said. “We are eating all the time.”

Jones dreaded the end of the season, with his football passion coming to an end. Jordan, Jones’ closest friend, is not ready for his friend to leave.
“I hadn’t thought about the end of this season,” Jones said.

Jordan and Jones started playing football when they were 6 and 12 years old on little league football teams. Those younger days were just the beginning; now, they are playing on varsity.
“I had started playing football when I was 6 years old, and have been playing for twelve years now,” Jones said.

As their football playing years went by, the two played under coaches who built them into the young men they are now. Back in Tre’s hometown, he clearly remembers his coach from little league serving as a big help towards him.
“My favorite coach ever is Zach, my little league coach from the Texans,” Jordan said.

Now that Jones’ high school experience is coming to an end, he cites his mom as his favorite coach. She is not a certified coach, but acts as a life coach for the 18-year-old.
“My mom has and will forever be my favorite coach,” Jones said. “She helps me with everything.”